Prefaces & Afterwords

Welcome to the Prefaces & Afterwords, Q&A interviews with authors. Watch this space for our conversations with writers who will be featured in upcoming events.

Get to know Festival volunteer Christine Hayvice

In 2013 Christine Hayvice volunteered for the first time for the Vancouver Writers Fest. We caught up with her as she was preparing to leave for New Zealand, where she will be working on a book about her family at the Michael King Writers’ Centre in Auckland.

Why did you decide to volunteer for the VWF this year?
I am retired and for the past few years have enjoyed volunteering at cultural events including the film festival and at the Cultch. I've always attended some events at VWF but either lacked time and/or money to see very many. Volunteering gave me the opportunity to see so much more.

Was the experience what you had expected?
It was more than I expected. I didn't know about the walk-a-writer gig and loved it. A chance to meet and chat with some of the authors.

Highlights?
Seeing and listening to Eleanor Catton, especially the one hour event with her and Hal. And, as I'm a Kiwi, I'm always keen to catch New Zealand writers.

How long have you been coming to the Festival?
Many years.

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Interviewing the Interviewer

Hal Wake and John FreemanConvergences. The final day of this year’s Writers Festival, a gorgeous Sunday afternoon in late October, Granville Island humming with people who seemed happy to be there, and two participants in an event who brought with them overlapping worlds of writers, those writers’ spirits crowding in to the low-lit intimacy of The Improv Centre. “I’m glad we made the effort to come,” my wife said to me at the end of the event. I often feel like that when I leave Festival events. Schedules, busy lives, time pressures, myriad reasons for not doing things, can keep many of us from the things that matter most. After engaging with the minds of writers at the Festival, people who think long and hard about our world and share their painstakingly constructed and personal responses to it, I frequently walk away with a sense of spiritual and intellectual intensification, as if everything has simultaneously been brought into sharper focus and given greater depth.

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Up All Night

The trio of authors on stage at "Up All Night" (Event #27) were serious welterweights. By the calculations of Ian Weir, the evening's moderator, Scott Turow, Jo Nesbø and Lisa Moore have sold some 50 million books between them. A number that no doubt increased by a bump after their insightful and candid time on the Performance Works stage last week. 

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Sunday Afternoon Tea

 

 

Event 80, hosted by Paul Grant, was a sold out event; the final event held at Granville Island for the 2012 festival. The Afternoon Tea, an annual fixture at the festival, lures in readers who most enjoy their books with a cup of tea and something sweet. And after five days of events, devoted attendees with a literary hangover may have needed a little something extra to keep their strength up!  Seated intimately at small round tables, the room buzzed with conversation and the clattering of cups and saucers. The authors were not expected to discuss their craft, to postulate, theorize, draw parallels, reveal their methods, or even take questions from the audience; they simply took to the podium to read.

The first author introduced was the local and much adored historical fiction author Mary Novik, who read from her latest novel, Muse.

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